Saturday, July 19, 2014

Interview with D. C. Cowan, Author of The Legend of the Black Rose

Today we are interviewing historical romance/paranormal romance author D.C. Cowan.

Describe the plot of your book in a few sentences.
The novel, The Legend of the Black Rose, follows Dr. James Blakemore and Ciscely Raymond as they search for their identity and purpose through their association with the Black Mist spirit of the Black Rose, Kula Kyrni Kara. The book has a deeper meaning to it. Most of us identify ourselves by superficial triggers set upon us by whichever society we live in. This book delves into physically, mentally, emotionally, “going in search of”.  It takes a look into a mirror of the character’s soul reflecting darkly hidden well kept secrets concerning our genetics background. The book takes twists and turns, ending up with Ciscely coming face to face with the illegitimate son of Dr. Blakemore, Dr. James (Jim) Blakemore-Stoddard, a well-known Chicago psychiatrist, in search of his illusive father and his heritance.  Which one of the many suitors in Ciscely’s life will she choose and whom will she lose in her obsession with her claim to the heritage of her ancestor, the Black Rose?

Who (age, gender, etc) do you think would most appreciate this book?
Adults interested in psychology, philosophy and interested in historical fiction with an element of mystery and romance. Also, preteens, teen and young adult age group especially females interested in their genetics or heritage.

What inspirations contributed to this book?
Great, Great Grandma Ginnie’s legacy as told my Grandfather William by his mother Louise, passed down to my mother, then to me.

Who was your favorite character to write? 
James (Jim) Blakemore-Stoddard and his shadow Mama Duvantée, also in search of his heritage and inheritance as he interacts with those around him.

What is your favorite book?
Believe it or not, the dictionary/thesaurus which helps me improve my word choices as I write. 

What genre do you read most frequently?
Books concerning word origins, play on words, multiple meanings of words, clichés. I especially enjoy making up acronyms for real words and names. 

How do you think you've evolved as a writer since when you first started?
Changing over from very short stories in a few paragraphs to dialogue character descriptions and actions have improved my writing quality tremendously.
 

Are there any aspects (e.g. character building, world building) of your writing that you've been practicing?
Just the opposite has occurred for me, writing allows me to set my limitations and allow me to dream my dreams without superseding reality, to resolve issues without personal involvement thus I call them Fantasy/ Reality diaries.
 

As a writer, one would assume English was your favorite class in school. If that was not the case, what was and why?
English per se did not list among my favorite subjects in school; instead, I loved the Arts including the Literary Arts, poetry, short stories, songs. I loved to read more than write. I enjoy using my abilities as an artist, songwriter, dancer, creator and illustrator to enhance the books I write.  I create my own society of people, religions and healing techniques, etc , which adds to the authenticity of my works.
 

How do you feel about the increasing popularity of ebooks?
In order to succeed, I must yield to change with the times. Ebooks prove people yet love to read as physical copies of books diminish. Whether electronic or physical copies of books, as long as people continue to read, whatever sells books has my approval.

What are your goals as a writer for the next ten years?
In the next ten years, I plan on organizing many of the stories my mother collected, write more books based upon other prompts and characters she entrusted to me, transfer her handwritten poetry and songs to computer perhaps to even use some in my writings. The next book in the Children of Kara series, The Legacy of the Black Karakuls, awaits its turn in the spotlight as a paperback or eBook.

What is the most impactful experience you have had with a fan?
So far, my family members are my only fans. Only my daughter had the courage and incentive to pursue this lifelong dream.

Have your family and friends been supportive of your writing?
Yes, very supportive, especially by allowing me time, space, etc. to establish my career as a writer. My daughter is my editor, my publicist, designer and everything else that a traditional publisher would have. My son and husband have also been very encouraging during this process of releasing my first book, even financially.

Is there any aspect of writing you don't like (e.g. editing)?

The need to rely so heavily on a computer. I grew up during a time with typewriters and everything was had written. In fact, The Legend of the Black Rose was handwritten and my daughter had to type it up for me.  

Have you ever had writer's block? If yes, how'd you deal with it? If you have not had writer's block, why do you think you haven't?
No, I have never had writer’s block, probably never will because I have an abundance of story prompts and fantasy/reality diaries my mother left me about her family and their past lives when the creativity slows down.

Do you write with a computer, typewriter, or pen and paper? Why do you use this tool?
 Computer, faster more efficient. I let my daughter handle that.

What do you have in mind for your next project?
My next project will pursue the opposite profile of my first book (i.e. a villain instead of a heroine). It will explore the psyche of a person pretending to be whom she is not for personal gain with any tactic available to her to do so profitable to do so. The next book The Legacy of the Black Karakul stars another James (Colton Murphy) and Alpha Kara Talbot. Acronyms play a very important role in this series. 

Is there anything else you'd like potential readers to know about your book?
I would like potential readers to know my book contain hidden meanings, as part of a series of books concerning very thought provoking issues of our times and those from the past, still relevant to them today.  It deals with multiple topics such as anger, hatred, deceit, disloyalty, insanity, fear, desperation, etc. with even the potential for use as a therapeutic guide for people with the disorders featured in it.

More Information
Author website: http://www.dccowanauthors.com/

Friday, July 11, 2014

Christine Sherborne, Author of Imogene’s Message – A Thriller of Extreme Prejudice

christine sherborne, imogene's message
Today we are interviewing Christine Sherborne, author of "Imogene's Message."

Describe the plot of your book in a few sentences.
When extreme religious fundamentalists known as the Phineas Priesthood led by Ezekiel Yates and his three cousins, target Xantara Pembroke because they believe she is a witch, they launch a major conflict between unworldly disciples of good and evil. This 60,000-word, action-packed thriller shows the twists and turns of both sides as they try to destroy or save the souls of earth.


Imogene is the daughter of Xantara, a Guardian of Avebury Circle, an ancient monument near Stonehenge. For over three thousand years, wives of eight village families have performed ceremonies to heal local people, with power handed down from first daughter to first daughter. The Pembroke family encounter extreme prejudice from the Priesthood.
Braedon the village doctor is drawn into a world he didn't know existed to protect his daughter. His wife Xantara keeps her secrets and causes conflict in the marriage.
All that is forgotten when Imogene levitates in Avebury Circle. Will the world believe Imogene’s incredible message?

Who (age, gender, etc) do you think would most appreciate this book?

Adult Male or Female.

What inspirations contributed to this book?

My interest in spirituality, and the paranormal.

Who was your favorite character to write?

Doctor Braeden Pembroke. We see a man who is basically good, gets sidetracked by tragedy, and then realizes what is important.

How long have you been writing?

Ten years.

What is your favorite book?

Lady of Hay by Barbara Erskine.
 
What genre do you read most frequently?

Thrillers.

How do you think you've evolved as a writer since when you first started?

I started writing self-help and inspirational books, then last year I decided to try writing a thriller, and found I loved creating my own story.

Are there any aspects (e.g. character building, world building) of your writing that you've been practicing?

Don McNair, my editor mentored me for nearly a year. I learnt so much from him, and I’m grateful for his patience.

As a writer, one would assume English was your favorite class in school. If that was not the case, what was and why?

Yes, English but also History.

How do you feel about the increasing popularity of ebooks?

I love my Ipad and use it all the time, but still visit my local library.

What are your goals as a writer for the next ten years?

I have finished the second in the Imogene series and will then write the third. I am very much a pantster, so time will tell.

What is the most impactful experience you have had with a fan?

I like to feel from feedback I’ve received that my self-help books and blogs have helped many people.

Have your family and friends been supportive of your writing?

Yes, which I appreciate.

Is there any aspect of writing you don't like (e.g. editing)?

Purely the time it takes to complete a book. My ideas flow faster than my writing!

Have you ever had writer's block? If yes, how'd you deal with it? If you have not had writer's block, why do you think you haven't?

I can only write when inspired which is most of the time. On the odd days I can’t write, I catch up on household chores.

Do you write with a computer, typewriter, or pen and paper? Why do you use this tool?

I use a computer as I touch type and has the advantage of a spell-checker.

What do you have in mind for your next project?

I’ve thought about another series with a supernatural theme involving an Art Gallery.

Is there anything else you'd like potential readers to know about your book?

My book has been professionally edited, which I believe is essential for any writer.


More Information

Buy the book on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Imogenes-Message-Paranormal-Don-McNair-ebook/dp/B00K91UC2Q

Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Amy Vansant, Author of Angeli - The Pirate, the Angel & the Irishman

Today we are interviewing Amy Vansant, author of "Angeli - The Pirate, the Angel & the Irishman."

Describe the plot of your book in a few sentences.
Legendary pirate Anne Bonny is alive and swashbuckling her way through the 21st century, but her stormy romantic life would make Blackbeard pack up ship and move to Kansas. Anne is a Sentinel, a soldier for mankind’s mysterious guardians, the Angeli. Anne will live 1000 years, but in return, she’s required to hunt Perfidia, corrupted Angeli who drain human energy to survive. After losing his corporeal body in battle, Anne’s fellow Sentinel and former lover, Con Carey, now visits her by possessing the bodies of humans. And Anne’s romance with the aloof Arch Angeli Michael has intensified... much to Con’s chagrin. Now this unusual love triangle must work together to defeat Seth, a Perfidian of untold power who threatens to end not only the Angeli, but the world.

Who (age, gender, etc) do you think would most appreciate this book?
Women from 18 to death. Particularly ones with a sense of humor!  I think men would like it too, but I assume the second I mention there is some “romance” they’ll mostly be out.

What inspirations contributed to this book?
It sounds silly, but I had a really elaborate dream that I thought made a good story. As I started to write it, it morphed, because once you start saying a dream out loud it always ends up making next to no sense, but that was the nugget that started Angeli.  The more significant part, was that I'd been a writer for years, a freelancer and the East Coast Editor of Surfer Magazine, but I'd stopped when my web designs business, Vansant Creations (here in Annapolis), took off. This dream reminded me how much I missed writing.

Who was your favorite character to write?
Probably Con the Irishman. He’s the funniest and I have a bit of a crush on him.

How long have you been writing?
Since I could! I still can’t believe I stopped for so long. It was like finding a piece of me I’d lost when I started again.

What is your favorite book?
Oh I have too many to mention - but many by Vonnegut, Salinger, Sedaris and Douglas Coupland.

What genre do you read most frequently?
Non fiction, actually. I’m reading Stiff by Mary Roach all about cadavers right now - it’s awesome.

How do you think you've evolved as a writer since when you first started?
I’d certainly like to think I’ve gotten better! The more you write the more you improve. The change from when I got back to writing 3-4 years ago to now is noticeable. Probably to everyone, definitely to me.


Are there any aspects (e.g. character building, world building) of your writing that you've been practicing?
I don’t set out to practice, but I see weaknesses and try and concentrate more. My strength is dialog so I try and be mindful when I’m describing scenes that the people reading can’t see what is in my head.

As a writer, one would assume English was your favorite class in school. If that was not the case, what was and why?
It was. I have a masters in English and taught English in college for a while back in the day… and I can’t spell and I suck at grammar. So fear for your children.

How do you feel about the increasing popularity of ebooks?
I never thought I’d get into reading on a iPad or Kindle but I recently did and have to say I really love it. It is also nice for authors because you get to keep a much larger percentage of an ebook sale. It is bad for authors I guess since everyone and their brother can flood the market with cheap books.

What are your goals as a writer for the next ten years?
Right now I think I want to have a new book out every 6 months. That might be a tad optimistic. I have my Angeli series for which I’m about to start a second book and I have a new series (romantic comedy) I hope to have the first book out before Christmas. It is called “Slightly Stalky” and is a fictional-ish account of how I stalked and bagged my husband! That will have 3 books, the stalking, the marriage/living, the old age. So it might be a while before I have to do that third book. I also have a mystery I started a while ago I need to finish.

What is the most impactful experience you have had with a fan?
I’ve had people illustrate my tweets for me… And recently people have been posting pictures of my book being read by them.. sitting at the pool, etc. That was really exciting!

Have your family and friends been supportive of your writing?

Absolutely! They have to be because I won’t stop begging them to post reviews.

Is there any aspect of writing you don't like (e.g. editing)?

Editing. I have someone else do that. I’m horrible.

Have you ever had writer's block? If yes, how'd you deal with it? If you have not had writer's block, why do you think you haven't?
If I’m stuck I usually go to sleep thinking about the problem and a solution appears by morning (usually). My only other cure is to just keep trying to write through it, even if I don’t like it - usually it will start to come to me and then I can just go back and erase or tweak what I’d done before.

Do you write with a computer, typewriter, or pen and paper? Why do you use this tool?
Computer. I write and rewrite and correct and correct - it would be a nightmare on a typewriter or paper.

What do you have in mind for your next project?
(See above)

Is there anything else you'd like potential readers to know about your book?
It is a lot of laughs, a lot of adventure and mystery and a smattering of romance/sexual tension. I’m not out to be the next Vonnegut or crank out terrible formulaic romances. I’m right in the middle! I think Angeli is a book people can relax and enjoy.

Oh, and I have a collection of humor essays I put together with 26 humorists/comedians called “Moms Are Nuts” - people might like that too!

More Information

Author website: http://www.amyvansant.com/ 
Buy the book on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0983719144
GoodReads page: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/22551359-angeli---the-pirate-the-angel-the-irishman

Stan I.S. Law, author of the ALEXANDER TRILOGY

Today we are interviewing Stanislaw Kapuscinski (aka Stan I.S. Law), author of the ALEXANDER TRILOGY (ALEC, ALEXANDER, and SACHA).

Describe the plot of your book in a few sentences
.
The ALEXANDER TRILOGY is a series of novels that follow the
three generations of Alexander Baldwin's family as they strive to meet their ultimate potential, learning much about the world and themselves along the way. The series incorporates elements of fantasy, adventure, and romance.

Who (age, gender, etc) do you think would most appreciate this book?
This trilogy, as all my books, is for all people who do not cast themselves into a specific genre but enjoy the complexities of life at physical, emotional, mental and spiritual levels.

What inspirations contributed to this book?

My inner-need to explore the human potential. Also my sailing, travels, (Also Heinlein’s “Stranger in a Strange Land”).

Who was your favorite character to write?
As becomes a Trilogy, my favorite characters are Alec, Alexander, and Sacha.

How long have you been writing?
Since I retired from architecture, a good 25 years ago.

What is your favorite book?

Too many to mention. All works by Shakespeare? Tao Te Ching, Light Upon Light (Inspirations from Rumi), Bible, Secret Doctrine, by H.P. Blavatsky.

What genre do you read most frequently?
Science, metaphysics, philosophy; although lately I read the stuff people send me asking for reviews.

How do you think you've evolved as a writer since when you first started?
I hope I continue to evolve daily. Since as a writer I am only a reflection of my daily contemplation, of my trials and errors, of the awe at the world/universe around me, and even of a little anger at stupidity of the masses, which includes most politicians, I am—even as my writing is—a work in progress. 

Are there any aspects (e.g. character building, world building) of your writing that you've been practicing?
As mentioned above, daily contemplation. Most of my inspiration comes at night. In the morning I just put it on ‘paper’. Much later I do the rewrite.

As a writer, one would assume English was your favorite class in school. If that was not the case, what was and why?
In school I couldn’t speak any English—I’d just escaped from the communist regime in Poland. I learned English much later, mostly from voluminous reading.

How do you feel about the increasing popularity of ebooks?

Great! It saves trees.

What are your goals as a writer for the next ten years?
I don’t plan that far ahead. At the moment I have 2 more books in mind. Non-fiction. One—art and poetry (my wife is an accomplished sculptor). Two—collection of my blogs.

What is the most impactful experience you have had with a fan?

1. I am discombobulated by people asking me for autographed copies. I want them to enjoy my books, not me. I don’t matter.
2.  People who take free copies, then downgrade them because they don’t understand them.

Have your family and friends been supportive of your writing?
Only my wife and some friends. Not many. Most don’t believe I’d written 30 books since I retired from architecture. They don’t quite understand that writing is more fun than practically anything else, and I am a hedonist.

Is there any aspect of writing you don't like (e.g. editing)?
Not really. I used to pay for editing. Now only my wife, friends, and myself edit my books. I can do it only about 3-4 months after I finished the first draft. Proofreading is another story. I don’t see my errors at all. My mind corrects all errors as though they weren’t there.

Have you ever had writer's block? If yes, how'd you deal with it? If you have not had writer's block, why do you think you haven't?
Yes. I started writing poetry, short stories and articles. Some of them become books, later.

Do you write with a computer, typewriter, or pen and paper? Why do you use this tool?
IMac. It’s 100x quicker to correct errors. I am touch-typist, of course. Without a computer I’d not have written 30+ books since I retired from my previous profession.

What do you have in mind for your next project?

See above.

Is there anything else you'd like potential readers to know about your books?
Which one? I’ll give you a general idea. I’ll quote a reader of mine: If you think you might be immortal—read Stan I.S. Law. If you want to be sure—read Stanislaw Kapuscinski. But first and foremost, READ. 


More Information
Author website: http://stanlaw.ca
Author on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_8?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=stan+i.s.+law&sprefix=Stan+i.s%2Cstripbooks%2C267&rh=n%3A283155%2Ck%3Astan+i.s.+law
Author on Smashwords: http://www.smashwords.com/books/byseries/4172

Author on Barnes and Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/c/stan-is-law
 

Tuesday, July 8, 2014

J.E. Plemons, Author of Last Light Falling: The Covenant, Book 1

Today we are interviewing J.E. Plemons about his YA novel, "Last Light Falling - The Covenant, Book I."

Describe the plot of your book in a few sentences.

For Gabriel and Arena, life has been short of exciting, but when they receive a special letter on their fifteenth birthday, history will forever change. Nations have fallen, economies have collapsed, and half the world's population has been wiped from the earth. The prophecy of the end is near and it's up to Gabriel and Arena to help prepare the world's demise by the wrath of God. Souls will rest in the providence of these ordinary twins put in an extraordinary situation, but when fate chooses them, they will have to accept their destiny changing their lives forever.

Who (age, gender, etc) do you think would most appreciate this book?
15 - 25 year old girls. Although young adult novels are becoming more and more popular with the adult crowd, it's hard to pinpoint the general audience, but yes, teens will love it.

What inspirations contributed to this book?
This story has turned into something bigger than what I had planned. After a brief stint negotiating a deal with a well-respected Marvel comic book artist, I finally decided to shelve the idea of the Last Light Falling comic book and focus solely on the novel, which I began in March of 2012. My original inspiration behind this series came from this comic book concept about two unlikely heroes battling the normal mundane trials of teenage experiences in high school. But the true inspiration falls back to my very own kids, Gabriel and Mikaela—my two unlikely heroes in this novel. The characters created are solely based on my children's personalities, and it's scary how close they really are. 

Who was your favorite character to write?
No doubt, Arena. It was so easy to create and develop her character because I mirrored her traits and personality from my own daughter. But the mundane trials she grows up with and faces in the story are based on my own personal experiences. I just thought it would give the novel better appeal if I vicariously lived them through this 15 year old girl.

How long have you been writing?
Always a great question. Since I was a wee lad. I used to storyboard all the time when I was six years old, but when the Choose Your Own Adventure books became popular, that's when I got serious about writing short stories. They were completely nonsensical, but so much fun to dream about. I'm a daydreamer by heart. Problem is, I don't know when to stop.

What is your favorite book?
That's a loaded question. I don't really have a favorite, just one or two that are sentimental for the memories they brought me. To Kill A Mocking Bird was probably one of the first stories that made me sad to read, but really helped me understand a character's real struggles. I really got so much from that book, but didn't realize it until much later in life. And of course I fell in love with C.S. Lewis books in the sixth grade way back when. The Hobbit changed me when I read it for the first time in the 7th grade.

What genre do you read most frequently?

Young Adult generally, specifically books with believable characters struggling with real problems. I have a bit of a twisted sense of humor and am attracted to books that are unpredictable. Psychological thrillers are my favorite.

How do you think you've evolved as a writer since when you first started?
My stories have become less linear and my characters are much more likable. They have purpose instead of just existing to exist. Every detail in my stories is connected in some way. It's those minor scenes or descriptions that play a small role in revealing something completely different and deeper. And many times it happens by pure accident.

Are there any aspects (e.g. character building, world building) of your writing that you've been practicing?
Dialogue, Dialogue, Dialogue. It can move a story, yet it can slow the prose in profound ways. It's an art no doubt, and I've been trying to craft mine for years. I used to write screen plays, but dialogue in a script is so much different than a novel. Where description moves a story in a novel, it's dialogue that pushes a story in film. Very different, yet both are hard to master. I absolutely detest clichés or tropes. It drives me insane.  

As a writer, one would assume English was your favorite class in school. If that was not the case, what was and why?
English class was natural to me, but it was far from my favorite subject. I don't think I ever completed any homework assignments on time in high school. I was born to be a musician. It's in the blood. My entire family are musicians, so Band was everything to me. I'm a classically trained percussionist/drummer. I'd rather have driven a funky beat than participate in an often uninspired class rendition of Hamlet.

How do you feel about the increasing popularity of ebooks?
Not a big fan. I still like paper in my hands, but I'm also a tech whore, so I'm not completely against it. I get the digital age we live in. It's good and bad. The problem with ebooks isn't with the reader, it's with the authors, or the three million who think they are. I'm glad that writers have the opportunity to share their work, unfortunately it works against us all as authors. Marketing and promotion is ever more as essential than it has been in the past. Because of the massive amounts of self-published work that's out there, the filter has become increasingly clogged with…how should I put this - terrible books. Pardon for the lack of articulation here. I would venture to say 75% of the self-published books out there have either been self-edited, or not edited at all. You'd be surprised. So when readers get a hold of those books that haven't been professionally edited, it taints their sense to browse for other self-published books. And there are some great authors out there that are getting over looked. The invasion of the ebook is the only thing keeping the pompous and pretensions publishes from destroying our egos. Ebooks are needed, but like all new and cool technology, it soon plateaus like everything else, and just becomes a piece of the puzzle.

What are your goals as a writer for the next ten years?
I'm not a full time writer so I'm quite content, but I would like to finish my four book series by the winter of 2015 so I can start on the hundreds of ideas I have just waiting to be written. I'm not in the business to be famous or to get rich. Like I said I'm content. I just like to write. I had my time in the entertainment business with music and film, but that period of my life is gone. If it comes back I'll embrace it, but until then, I'm just going to enjoy the ride. Damn, that makes me sound like an old person.

Have your family and friends been supportive of your writing?

Absolutely, especially my wife and kids. My kids are always giving me ideas. In fact there are two scenes in book II Into The Darkness that came from them almost verbatim. They watch a lot of indie flicks. My son desires to be a film director. My nine year old daughter is writing her first zombie screenplay. And of course I had to marry an editor, but this was way before I thought I would be an author. She's the first set of eyes that critiques my work, and boy can she be honest. I wouldn't want it any other way though. As humbling as it can be, it makes my manuscript happy, happy, happy for my editor.

Is there any aspect of writing you don't like (e.g. editing)?
See question above. No matter what I write, I know my manuscripts are coming back from the editor with 10,000 words stripped. I cringe every time I open up the file. But that's what they get paid to do, and very handsomely I might add.

Have you ever had writer's block? If yes, how'd you deal with it? If you have not had writer's block, why do you think you haven't?
Yes and it's quite frustrating. I was asked how I dealt with it before and I'll answer it the same way. I exercise, watch a movie, read a book, play my drums, have sex. Not in any particular order, as some may derail others. ; )

Do you write with a computer, typewriter, or pen and paper? Why do you use this tool?
Typewriter…what's that? I actually had to learn on one in high school if that tells you how old I am. The next year we got a "word processors". I jot down ideas on paper at the strangest times. I always carry around a pad and pen in my car. If I'm in a store, I pull out the iPhone. But my computer is my best friend when it comes to exploring the meat of the novel. My keyboard is worn from my finger tips and probably doesn't care that I use him as my crumb disposal.

What do you have in mind for your next project?

I'm currently working on "Last Light Falling - Kingdoms Of The Ten, Book III." I'm about three quarters done. It's been a long ride with this one, but I'm loving every minute of it. I've vested so much into these characters, I will be sad to leave them when the fourth and final book of the series is over. When I type those two words on the last page, I think I just might cry…hey, real men cry.

Is there anything else you'd like potential readers to know about your book?
You can get all the information you want about the entire series, backstory, and concept on my website: http://www.lastlightfalling.com/And if you really want to get inside my head, then please if you get a chance, read my book. Much is based on my own personal experiences, but I won't tell you what is real and what is embellished. You really don't want to know. Trust me. ;)


More Information

Book website: http://www.lastlightfalling.com/  
Buy the book on Amazon: www.amazon.com/Last-Light-Falling-Covenant-Book-ebook/dp/B00JFYNPPO


Sunday, July 6, 2014

Phillip Drayer Duncan, Author of Assassins Inc.

scifi, author, phillip, space, air travel, future, assassins

Today we are interviewing Phillip Drayer Duncan about his sci-fi novel, Assassins Inc.


Describe the plot of your book in a few sentences. 
So you’re an assassin. The company you work for just gave you a new target. There’s only one problem… YOU are the target.

Who (age, gender, etc) do you think would most appreciate this book?

Fanboys, geeks, and nerds like me. The video game generation if you will. Hard to put a specific age on us, but probably guys and gals 18 – 35. And I only say 18 because of the adult content, sorry kidos ;)

What inspirations contributed to this book?

 I actually came across the concept in a dream one night. Just the idea of an assassin being hired to kill himself, being forced on the run, unable to trust anyone. I’ve really wanted to write this story for several years.

Who was your favorite character to write?

 The main character Brandon was a lot of fun, that sort of lovable loser I think we can all relate too. I imagine everyone has those times when they just feel like to no matter what they do the universe is kind of against them.

How long have you been writing?
 

Off and on since I learned to read, but never seriously until about two years ago.

What is your favorite book?
 

I have to pick just one!? Well… geez, that’s tough. I usually fall back to Legend, by David Gemmell when I have to pick just one. That was the first adult book I read that really just blew me away.

What genre do you read most frequently?

 Like my writing, I’m kind of all over the place. I don’t worry about genre so much as story. I mean you won’t see me shopping the romance section, but I can’t say I love sci-fi more than fantasy or vice versa.

How do you think you've evolved as a writer since when you first started?

 I like to think I’m getting better. It certainly feels that way to me. I look back on earlier things, and all I see are mistakes I wouldn’t be as likely to make today. I don’t stumble nearly as often, or hit my fingers with the hammer, or overbake the turkey as often anymore, but I still have a lot to learn.

Are there any aspects (e.g. character building, world building) of your writing that you've been practicing?

 Editing. Some might not consider it a direct part of the writing process, but it’s still the most important. Great writing CAN’T make a poorly edited book look good, but great editing CAN make a poorly written book look good… Or something like that. 

As a writer, one would assume English was your favorite class in school. If that was not the case, what was and why?
 

Actually, other than the creative writing part, I hated English class. It was always one of my strongest subjects, but it bored me to tears. I enjoyed science and history the most.

How do you feel about the increasing popularity of ebooks?
 

Personally, I prefer to hold a physical book in my hand, but ebooks taking over is inevitable. If people prefer reading on a device I’m all for it, being bitter about a changing world won’t keep it from changing.

What are your goals as a writer for the next ten years?
 

Write, edit, publish, sell, repeat…. Hopefully in that order. In all honesty I haven’t really thought about it that far. Within 10 years, I will probably have finished off a lot of character’s storylines. Vanguard of The Desolate World will surely be finished, We Are From Earth will also very likely be finished, and The Moonshine Wizard will probably be getting pretty close… Don’t tell any of the Moonshine Wizard fans I said that… They may hurt me.

What is the most impactful experience you have had with a fan?

 That is really tough to say. I’ve had some really meaningful ones, but perhaps the biggest eye opening one for me was when I was in a crowded room and idly mentioned in conversation that I would be starting the 2nd Moonshine Wizard novel soon, and all across the room people started yelling at me, “It’s about time!” “We’re tired of waiting!” “C’mon already! I wanna’ know what happens!” There was a brief moment of, ‘What did I get myself into?’ followed, by the realization that these people really love this story, and well, for the writer, that’s pretty special.

Have your family and friends been supportive of your writing?
 

Very much so. They come to book signings, helped me haul books across the country to cons, dragged me out of bed early so I could make in time for an interview, they’ve edited, they’ve beta read, they too have yelled at me for not continuing my storylines. I’ve been very blessed to have a lot of supportive people around me that are always willing to lend a hand.

Is there any aspect of writing you don't like (e.g. editing)?

 Writing. Don’t get me wrong, I love writing or I wouldn’t do it, but a lot of the time it’s kind of like trying to make yourself go to the gym. I’ll find any excuse not to sit down and actually do the writing.

Have you ever had writer's block? If yes, how'd you deal with it? If you have not had writer's block, why do you think you haven't?

 No writer’s block, but Writer’s laziness is a real problem. As far as beating writer’s block, if I’m not sure what’s going to happen next, I just make something happen. Make the main character fight someone, make some strange happen, or just make something funny happen. For me, it’s easier to connect the dots once the content exists.

Do you write with a computer, typewriter, or pen and paper? Why do you use this tool?
 

I love writing with pen and paper, however I hate trying to read my hand writing and retyping, so I do it all on the computer. I can’t justify not doing it on the computer. It makes the editing process a million times easier.

What do you have in mind for your next project?

 If I say anything other than The 2nd Moonshine Wizard novel I might not live long enough to start another project, so let’s go with that.

Is there anything else you'd like potential readers to know about your book?

If you haven’t read any of my other work, Assassins Incorporated is a great place to start. Regardless of what genre you read, if you have a sense of humor you’ll probably enjoy it. If you’re a geeky fanboy like myself you will probably love it.


More Information
Buy the book on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Assassins-Incorporated-Phillip-Drayer-Duncan/dp/1937105520
Author website:  http://phillipdrayerduncan.com/

Friday, July 4, 2014

Gregory Lloyd, Author of The Sword of Agrippa

Today we are interviewing author Gregory Lloyd about his speculative fiction novel, "The Sword of Agrippa."

Describe the plot of your book in a few sentences. 
 As a scientist takes on the world’s oligarchs as he searched for dark energy his dreams take him back into the life of a young Roman engineer who is transformed by a visit to the Great Library of Alexandria. Science and shamanism, future and past collide in this debut indie novel.

Who (age, gender, etc) do you think would most appreciate this book?

 18+

What inspirations contributed to this book?
 
A series of vivid dreams which began in 2004, which drove me to read various texts from the world’s mystery schools, religions and cultures.  Beneath the veneer of culture, everything seemed the same.  The path led me to a strange, awe-inspiring sense of entanglement which I wanted to express as the story took shape in my mind.

Who was your favorite character to write?

 Marcus Agrippa, an unsung hero to western civilization.

How long have you been writing?

 For perhaps 30 years between college, grad school and my professional career.  I write a blog on cloud computing, for example.  I started the novel a few years ago as the dreams became overpowering.  They eased as I started writing and underwent hypnosis related to mental blocks.

What is your favorite book?

 I have many.  The Pilgrimage by Paulo Coelho is up there with The Master and Margarita by Bulgakov.

What genre do you read most frequently?
 
Spirituality and Dreaming followed by news feeds on science and innovation.

How do you think you've evolved as a writer since when you first started?

 I’ve been writing technical materials for years, especially related to the evolution of information technology.  Shifting to novel writing was a big leap for me.

Are there any aspects (e.g. character building, world building) of your writing that you've been practicing?

Yoga.  I’ve been obsessed with modernization and the march of progress since a very young age.

As a writer, one would assume English was your favorite class in school. If that was not the case, what was and why?
 
At Reed College I took a course called The Systematic Studies of Religion and another on Quantitative Analysis. They had a significant impact on how I understood the world.

How do you feel about the increasing popularity of ebooks?

 I think it’s amazing.

What are your goals as a writer for the next ten years?
 
Finish my novel by end of 2014.  After that I’ll let the underground river take me where it may.

What is the most impactful experience you have had with a fan?
 
Deep, meaningful discussions on where science and spirituality are going and how both are critically important to the age we are entering. A mutual sense of keeping ourselves open to the unknown.

Have your family and friends been supportive of your writing?
 
Yes, especially since I launched the Kickstarter campaign end of May.

Is there any aspect of writing you don't like (e.g. editing)?

 Not yet. :)

Have you ever had writer's block? If yes, how'd you deal with it? If you have not had writer's block, why do you think you haven't?

 Yes.  As the Roman warship approached Alexandria in 48BC I kept writing on and on about the trip to get there. Endless details about stops, messages, the changing color of the water as we passed the Nile delta, etc.  I was afraid to go further. I went under hypnosis.  It released a torrent of emotions. Ultimately, hypnosis helped me to achieve clarity and conceptualize the rest of the story.  There are some very devastating events to unfold there as the novel takes shape.  They were not easy to think about at the time. Deeply personal and troubling events.

Do you write with a computer, typewriter, or pen and paper? Why do you use this tool?

 I’m hooked on the PC and MSFT Word.

What do you have in mind for your next project?

 Perhaps a print edition.  I have no other book simmering beneath the surface. This is it.

Is there anything else you'd like potential readers to know about your book?

 It is my best effort to connect large groups of people who might otherwise feel disconnected.  We are all entangled with each other.

More Information

Buy the book on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Sword-Agrippa-Science-Mysticism-Innovation-ebook/dp/B00LCOTMCU

Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Brian White, Author of Nightfall

Today we are interviewing Brian White about his mystery/suspense novella, "NIGHTFALL."

Describe the plot of your book in a few sentences.
A beautiful young escort is strangled to death, her corpse discarded in a back alley dumpster. The killer's identity is a mystery, and the homicide has gone almost unnoticed. Welcome to Middleton, where these things happen every night and the police are too busy or too jaded to notice.
Ezzy Morgan once roamed these blue collar streets as a paramedic. Here she was weaned from innocence and taught the cold-blooded nature of the human heart. Now she works as a private detective and has shut the door on shootings, stabbings, and the constant specter of death. But her life is about to be shattered when the dead woman's only surviving friend seeks her out, looking for justice.

Clues are sparse and the trail seems to be a dead end before it has even begun. But the mystery takes a macabre turn after another death is dropped at Ezzy's feet, and she's hit with an ultimatum from the world of organized crime: find the killer in the next twenty-four hours . . . or die.

Who (age, gender, etc) do you think would most appreciate this book?

A focus group revealed that babies have the widest range of opinions. During a reading their reactions ranged from giggling with outright joy at a particular passage, to going so far as to soil themselves during another. Fans of mystery, suspense, and crime books will also enjoy it.

What inspirations contributed to this book?

My cousin, a photographer, was talking about doing a series of photographs starring a female detective. He wondered if I could write a story to which he could place them. Sensing the million dollar movie deal that would undoubtedly come from such a work I pushed him off the cliff we happened to be walking along and stole the entire idea for myself.

Who was your favorite character to write?

Ishmael. But then I found out that Melville bloke had already written him. Louis Credo was pretty cool. I like the idea of a cocaine addicted cop. Functioning addicts are seldom portrayed. Usually we see addicts as barely hanging on wastes of life. But there is a huge amount of people out there who are great at their jobs whilst being addicted to one thing or another. Credo might show up again.

What is your favorite book?

That’s like asking me to pick a favorite drink out of the near endless selection of choices. It would be gin. And my favorite book is Stephen King’s It.

How do you think you've evolved as a writer since when you first started?

Well, the mole on my arm might be getting bigger, but it doesn’t seem to have affected my writing ability one way or another. I just keep putting the words on the page and, for some reason, people keep reading them.

Are there any aspects (e.g. character building, world building) of your writing that you've been practicing?

I don’t practice anything specifically. It’s a very unrefined process. I sit down, write a story. Rewrite it until I can’t think of a way to make it better, and then let it go out into the world. Reading was always intuitive for me. I know if I like a story or not. And I don’t have to break it down into its individual parts to know I liked it. It’s the same with writing. I know if the story I’m writing is entertaining to me or teaching me something. I follow my gut, in other words.

As a writer, one would assume English was your favorite class in school. If that was not the case, what was and why?

No, I hated English. Probably because it was either about finding verbs and nouns and learning what the hell a gerund was. That stuff is boring. I liked science. Try to make recognizing an adverb stand up against learning what happens to matter as it approaches the event horizon of a black hole and it’s no contest. Even writers don’t write about English. They write about the cool stuff that happens outside of English class.

How do you feel about the increasing popularity of ebooks?

Excited. I know we all have an attachment to bound books. But digital format is not going away. Its low production cost and multiple formats make literature more accessible than it’s ever been. And for all you going on about the smell of “real” books. It’s the words that make the book what it is, not that damn odor.

What are your goals as a writer for the next ten years?

To keep writing.

Have your family and friends been supportive of your writing

 Some have, some haven’t. The ones who have supported me will have a secure place in my kingdom when I rule the world. The ones who didn’t support me . . . God help the poor sods.

Is there any aspect of writing you don't like (e.g. editing)?

It sounds horrible since it’s exactly what I’m doing now, but promoting. It’s not that I don’t like it, but I’d much rather have Harry Potter come and wave his wand and make that part take care of itself so I could focus all my energy on writing.

Do you write with a computer, typewriter, or pen and paper? Why do you use this tool?

Computer all the way. My dad had an old typewriter that I used a few times for kicks. It wasn’t a bad way to knock out a first draft, but it was still obsolete compared to digital word processing. I tried pen and paper a few times because I liked the idea of doing it that way. But it was ill-fated. My handwriting is terrible to begin with, and trying to knock out a first draft and keep up with stream of consciousness that way leads to hand cramps and an unintelligible mess on the paper.

Is there anything else you'd like potential readers to know about your book?
Nightfall has been shown in studies to reduce one’s risk of cancer. Nine out of ten dentists prefer it. Some studies also show that it can reverse male pattern baldness and ED in men over fifty. It has also been shown to be 100% effective in alleviating boredom if purchased right now. Length of effectiveness may vary depending on individual reading speed.



More Information

Buy the book on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00K08RQP4