Friday, August 29, 2014

Interview with Tranea Prosser, author of Celibacy, What Was I Thinking?

Today we are interviewing Tranea Prosser, author of the humor/motivational book Celibacy, What Was I Thinking?

Describe the plot of your book in a few sentences.
My book takes you on my journey to learn about making better relationship decisions and why I am celibate and how to maintain the lifestyle.

Who (age, gender, etc) do you think would most appreciate this book?

I believe young ladies ages 12 and up and women of all ages.

What inspirations contributed to this book?

From my personal experience, I hope to be able to save some women from making un-wise decisions regarding their relationships with men.

Who was your favorite character to write?

All of the men I never dated.

How long have you been writing?

I started journaling in 2000 and had about five journals to review in deciding what content to add to the book.

What genre do you read most frequently?

Non-fiction romance and biographies.

How do you feel about the increasing popularity of ebooks?

I think it’s great and people are so busy that they want to carry around less bulk and reading on the go will fit into everyone’s lifestyle. 

What is the most impactful experience you have had with a fan?
The youngest fan I had was 10 years old and she was so excited to buy my book. I was thinking about how smart she will be in discovering her self-worth and pray that she mentor’s other young ladies in her age group.

Have your family and friends been supportive of your writing?

Yes, my family has been very supportive and proud of me.

Is there any aspect of writing you don't like (e.g. editing)?

Editing and re-writing. I feel like a part of my voice is being pampered with!

Have you ever had writer's block? If yes, how'd you deal with it?

I deal with writer’s block by not rushing or forcing myself to write anything. I focus on other projects and usually when I get something else started like planning a conference, or a comedy show, then the urge to write for a different topic makes its presence known.

Do you write with a computer, typewriter, or pen and paper? Why do you use this tool?

I use all of them because it depends on where and whom I am speaking with when an idea strikes. I always keep a small notebook in my purse. I keep a pad by the telephone. When I am ready to put all the ideas together, I use my computer.

Is there anything else you'd like potential readers to know about your book?

It is safe for men to read because it is not about male-bashing!

More Information
Author website: www.miztcomedy.com

 


Monday, August 25, 2014

Interview with Rich Marcello, author of The Big Wide Calm

Today we are interviewing Rich Marcello, author of the coming-of-age novel The Big Wide Calm.


Describe the plot of your book in a few sentences.

Paige Plant is destined to be a rock star, to save the world, to inspire revolutions with her songs, and that is exactly what she sets out to do in The Big Wide Calm. Rich Marcello’s new novel follows Paige on her quest to create the perfect album–12 songs that will make her galactically famous and, during their creation, take her to places she never imagined possible.

Paige has talent, ambition and mega-musical skills. All she needs is a big break. Enter John Bustin, a mysterious former singer/songwriter who offers Paige one year of free room and board at his recording studio so she can make her album. John believes in Paige’s potential but not her current batch of songs. Before writing new ones, Paige must tap into the place underneath emotion that is the source of all transcendent, multigenerational art; she must tap into The Big Wide Calm. With John’s help, Paige hones her songwriting skills, both technically and emotionally, and with Paige’s help, John confronts the dark secrets of his past, secrets which rock the foundation of their relationship.


Who (age, gender, etc) do you think would most appreciate this book?
Anyone who likes a strong female character, who likes millennial coming-of-age stories, who likes music.

What inspirations contributed to this book?

This is the second of three books I’m writing about different kinds of love. The first, The Color of Home, came out in 2013, and the third, The Beauty of the Fall, will be out in 2015. So the main inspiration was to write down everything I believe about love. This book in particular was more about platonic love, though there’s a fair amount of romantic love in it as well.

Who was your favorite character to write?
Both Paige and John. 
 

How long have you been writing?
I’ve been writing in one form or the other all my life. I’ve published several hundred poems and songs, and for the last four years I’ve been working on my novels.

What is your favorite book?
The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera. Actually, I love all of his books, but that one in particular.

What genre do you read most frequently?
Literary fiction.

How do you think you've evolved as a writer since when you first started?
I’ve found my voice as a writer, to the point where I’ve been able to effectively incorporate different elements—poetic language, poetry, lyrics, plot devices, realistic dialogue, first-person present tense narrators—into my stories. I’ve also honed my craft a bit. Sometimes I’ll write a scene fifty times until I get the words right, after writing the initial draft very fast. Rewriting a scene often seems to work best for me. I didn’t know that when I first started.

Are there any aspects (e.g. character building, world building) of your writing that you've been practicing?
I try to practice as many elements as I can when I’m writing. Character building. World building. Writing sensory scenes. Plot turns. Dialogue. Really, whatever is needed for the story I’m telling and whatever will push me as a writer. In The Big Wide Calm, I had a blast writing Paige, and I’m really happy with the way she turned out.

As a writer, one would assume English was your favorite class in school. If that was not the case, what was and why?
Well, I’m also a technologist, so I liked English and science classes equally.

How do you feel about the increasing popularity of ebooks?
I’m fine with it. It provides readers with a lower price point, which is good news. Also, with the new generation of e-readers, the quality of the reading experience is getting better and better.

What are your goals as a writer for the next ten years?
For the next year, I plan to finish The Beauty of the Fall. After that, I have a good ten or so novels in me. I plan to write for the rest of my life.

What is the most impactful experience you have had with a fan?
A fan who read The Big Wide Calm told me it was one of the most emotional experiences she ever had reading a novel. She told me the book was a work of multi-generational art. That’s what I was going for as a writer, probably what we all go for as writers, so it was great to see my novel connected with someone in that way.

Have your family and friends been supportive of your writing?
Yes. One-hundred percent.

Is there any aspect of writing you don't like (e.g. editing)?
No, I like the whole process. It’s what I was meant to do with my life.

Have you ever had writer's block? If yes, how'd you deal with it? If you have not had writer's block, why do you think you haven't?

I haven’t had it. I think that’s because I have a lot I want to say, and I want to make sure by the time all is said and done years from now, that I’ve had a chance to say it all.

Do you write with a computer, typewriter, or pen and paper? Why do you use this tool?
I write on a computer using Storyist. I’m comfortable with technology, and Storyist is a great program.

What do you have in mind for your next project?
To finish The Beauty of the Fall.

Is there anything else you'd like potential readers to know about your book?
That’s all. Thanks for taking the time to speak with me.

More Information
Author website: www.richmarcello.com

 

Sunday, August 24, 2014

Interview with Michael Hickland, author of The Guardian of Genghis Khan's Tomb

Today we are interviewing Michael Hickland, author of the tremendously engaging and imaginative historical fiction novel The Guardian of Genghis Khan's Tomb.

I just finished the book and really enjoyed the perfect combination of adventure and history. For people who haven't read the book, please describe the plot of your book in a few sentences. 
Looking at a map today, Genghis Khan conquered a geographic area which including 30+ countries and 3+ billion people. He had amassed enormous quantities of jewels, gold and silver believed to be buried with him. Kate Barrows, a beautiful English scientist digging for fossils in Mongolia finds his childhood bow ignites a potential conflict among the superpowers. To find the tomb means capturing wealth capable of changing the world’s balance of power. Drew Moss, her American sponsor/financier, attempts to protect her and prevent a global war while excavating the lost crypt.

Who (age, gender, etc) do you think would most appreciate this book?

 The book would be enjoyed by anyone liking Indiana Jones and Lara Croft movies as well as readers of Dan Brown, Ken Folett and Clive Cussler books. I guess the 17 year old and up age group will love the adventure, romance and action contained in it.

What inspirations contributed to this book?

 A business trip to Asia cemented the importance of Genghis Khan and inspired me to write the book.

Who was your favorite character to write?

 It is needless to say that Genghis Khan was my favorite character to write about. Not only did he create a country in Mongolia, but one of every 200 people on this planet carries his genes. To my mind he is the most complex and fascinating of all conquerors.

How long have you been writing?
I’ve been writing for about five years.

What is your favorite book?

 My favorite book is “Tai-Pan” by James Clavell. It is a remarkable tale of the English traders that founded what is modern day Hong Kong.

What genre do you read most frequently?

 I read adventure/action books in addition to historical fiction. I think your readers will find both in my book.

How do you think you've evolved as a writer since when you first started?

 I was a Sales and Marketing executive whose first book “Seven Secrets of SuperSelling” provided its readers with a formula for being a top producing sales person for any organization. But my real love is history and the people in it that changed our world. I’ve evolved into a writer of fiction.

Are there any aspects (e.g. character building, world building) of your writing that you've been practicing?

 For me learning to write dialog that draws in and holds the reader’s attention has the greatest degree of difficulty. It is something I’m always working on.

As a writer, one would assume English was your favorite class in school. If that was not the case, what was and why?

 English was never my favorite subject. History and Mathematics were. My impatience as a youth didn’t lend itself to the hard work needed for excellent creative writing.

How do you feel about the increasing popularity of ebooks?

 E books are undoubtedly the future of the industry. However, I lament the coming extinction of one of my favorite haunts-the bookstore.

What are your goals as a writer for the next ten years?

 I plan to continue writing new adventures for the team of ex-Navy Seal /billionaire Drew Moss and stunning paleontologist Kate Barrows. Their romance will evolve.

What is the most impactful experience you have had with a fan?

 Perhaps the most surprising aspect of my writing is the fans and friends it has brought me. I have hundreds of Mongol readers and fans. My favorite experience with a fan is the friend and pen pal I’ve made with a fine Moroccan young man, Jamal Aidani. He is a very bright fellow.

Have your family and friends been supportive of your writing?

 My family has been very supportive of my writing. At least my wife treasures the peace and quiet it allows her.

Have you ever had writer's block? If yes, how'd you deal with it? If you have not had writer's block, why do you think you haven't?

 Yes, I do get writer’s block and I usually resolve it by reading first rate thrillers like the books of Preston and Child.

Do you write with a computer, typewriter, or pen and paper? Why do you use this tool?
 
My computer has far too many rewritten chapters stored on it, but without my pc I would be mute.

What do you have in mind for your next project?

 Currently, I working on a new one titled “The Sword of Amun”. It is set in Egypt and concerns the discovery of the grave of a very famous warrior.

Is there anything else you'd like potential readers to know about your book?

 The exciting life of Genghis Khan including his conquests and massive treasure continue to influence events today. There is a very large National Geographic project currently under way to locate his lost tomb. International cooperation is permitting the use of the most advanced technologies in the search for it. It is important to note that this team of scientists is respectful of the reverence in which he is held by Mongols as their national hero. Disturbing the spirit of the Great Conqueror is not what they will do.

More Information

Buy the book on Amazon: http://goo.gl/XuV9Uh

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Willow Danes, Author of Captured

captured, willow danes, willow danes captured, willow danes warriors of hir
Today we are interviewing Willow Danes, author of Captured, the first book in the science-fiction romance series Warriors of Hir.

Describe the plot of your book in a few sentences.
Jenna McNally is tending to the heartrending task of clearing out her grandfather’s cabin when she’s knocked off her feet by the impact of a nearby plane crash. She races into the snowy North Carolina woods to help and discovers that this is no plane that’s crashed.

Ra’kur’s people have been brought to the brink of extinction by war. After years spent searching for a compatible mate to bond with, an enemy attack lands him on a backward, primitive planet and right to the very female he has been seeking. And a Hir warrior’s first task in claiming a mate is to capture her . . .

Who (age, gender, etc) do you think would most appreciate this book?
Over 18, due to language and sexual situations.

Who was your favorite character to write?

I loved both Jenna and Ra'kur and they were so much fun to write! You know you have a great character when they just seem to jump right off the page.

How long have you been writing?
Since I could! Maybe 4 or 5 years old. I used to write stories with illustrations done in crayon and publish little books made of construction paper and yarn to hand out to people. Yes, really.

What is your favorite book?
I have so many!  I love historical, Romances, Sci-fi. Nope, too many to name. :)

What genre do you read most frequently?
Probably historical and Sci-fi although I most often write Romances.

How do you think you've evolved as a writer since when you first started?

I wrote my first complete novel at 20. It was AWFUL. It took me a while to understand that it's completely okay to write a couple books before you get good at it. And don't show your novel to friends and family. They can't help you and may do you a lot of harm. You need a developmental editor you respect or a workshop or a couple of beta readers who know how to give honest but helpful feedback. Never, never, never give up.

Are there any aspects (e.g. character building, world building) of your writing that you've been practicing?
Cheat sheets! I keep a running log of everyone's name, family, eye color, etc. so my editors and I can keep track. When you write Sci-fi you aren't going to use standard names so spell check won't catch it if you accidentally change the spelling of a character's name (happened to me but I have a sharp editor!) from one chapter to the next. It can get pretty complicated when you're building new worlds.

As a writer, one would assume English was your favorite class in school. If that was not the case, what was and why?
I love history—to me it’s like kindergarten story time again. I learned a lot about world building from studying ancient civilizations—like trade, the role of religion, gender politics and how the geography of a region shapes the evolution of a society.

How do you feel about the increasing popularity of ebooks?

As a Romance writer I love it!! Believe it or not, a surprising number of my readers are men and being able to download a book to their iPad or kindle means they WILL buy a book they wouldn't have if they were forced to carry around a paperback with a 'bodice-ripper' type cover.

What are your goals as a writer for the next ten years?
I want to make it to the New York Times bestseller list!

What is the most impactful experience you have had with a fan?

I got my first email from an actual fan a few months ago and I was floored.  I had a fan!! And she was delighted when I wrote back to her. Really made all the late nights and hard work worth it.

Have your family and friends been supportive of your writing?
Yes, my boys are very proud that their mom’s a writer—although they aren’t permitted to read any of my books since they’re intended for adult audiences.

Is there any aspect of writing you don't like (e.g. editing)?

I worry when I do research for historicals and it can be tedious to track down very minute (but important) details because people just didn’t record them. Believe me, people who read Romances read A LOT of them, when you slip up they’ll catch it so it’s important to document your sources. Sometimes though, popular misconceptions, like women always rode sidesaddle—they didn’t, that began after 1450 in England—means you got it right when you have your 1437 heroine ride astride but your readers will say that’s incorrect.

Have you ever had writer's block? If yes, how'd you deal with it? If you have not had writer's block, why do you think you haven't?
I get writer’s block with EVERY SINGLE BOOK. I write the first half (100-150 pages) like crazy, can’t type fast enough then I just  . . . get stuck. The whole ‘I don’t know what happens next and anyway this whole book sucks’ gets me. When I feel that coming on I have to do something else. Binge watch shows on Netflix, bake, workout, put Modpodge and glitter on my shoes (yes, really). Pretty soon I have at least a later scene that I write down, or maybe the very last scene and I just keep doing that, back and forth, until I have a finished book.

Do you write with a computer, typewriter, or pen and paper? Why do you use this tool?
Laptop!! I write at odd hours and in bed, sometimes at 5:30 am or 10 pm, and I always need to look something up so I need WIFI.

What do you have in mind for your next project?
Next up is Taken (Warriors of Hir, Book 2)!

Is there anything else you'd like potential readers to know about your book?

The Warriors of Hir is a wonderfully fun Sci-fi Romance series and I’m really looking forward to releasing the new books. Also, at the end of each novel you get to meet the hero of the next book!


More Information
Buy the book on Amazon
Check out the book on Goodreads

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Interview with Billy Joe Davis, author of My Neighbor My Stalker

Today we are interviewing non-fiction author Billy Joe Davis.

Describe the content of your book in a few sentences. 
The book “My Neighbor My Stalker” is about my personal experience and what happened to me as a result of befriending a convicted stalker unbeknownst to me. Ive also tried to include helpful information that I’ve learned along the way to educate the reader so that they may possibly avoid a situation like mine. Unbeknownst to many there are different types of stalkers and mental profiles.

Who (age, gender, etc) do you think would most benefit from reading this book?

I think the full adult age range would benefit from reading this book, because we take so much for granted on a daily basis when dealing with people, we assume because we haven’t done anything overtly close to attracting any  type of criminal element or mentally ill individual, stalking couldn’t possibly happen to us.

What inspired you to write this book?

I guess the fact that being stalked happened so easily and unexpectedly I was very naïve in thinking something like this could not possibly happen to me, I wanted people to know how easily it was to happen in the course of daily activity and interaction with others

How long have you been writing?

I guess you could say I have been writing off and on since I was in elementary school my first sister gave me as a birthday gift one day one of those zipper diaries that you would give little kids or teenagers, that’s when my interest in writing began. I think I also benefited from the fact that when I was very young, my fathers side of the family that lived far away from us was very big on letter writing. My mom would read the letters to me and allow me to help in responding to the letters.

How do you feel about the increasing popularity of ebooks?

Actually I think e-books are wonderful thing. I think the ebook gives a voice to many individuals out there that wouldn’t otherwise be able to afford to speak their mind give their opinion and tell their story to the public. I also think it’s revolutionized the way we can receive and process information anywhere anytime so long as we have a computer, tablet or cell phone. If I had to wait to be able to afford an editor and a book publishing company or book deal most likely my stories would never be told, just as I’m sure thousands of other individuals would have to remain silent.

What are your goals as a writer for the next ten years?

It would be wonderful to be able to support myself financially through my writing.  I’m hoping that I’m able to continue my writing and that eventually my books reach a wider audience. I would like my readers to benefit and learn from the mistakes that I’ve made in my own life. Over the next 10 years I would like several of my real-life experiences to be published and become widely read.

Have your family and friends been supportive of your writing?

I wish I could say I had lots of support, but  being that most of my family’s deceased and the particular experience that I’m describing in my current book is pretty much scared away or frightened most the individuals and people that I knew so as far as writing I’m pretty much alone in this, other than my readers.

Since you’re still going through this ordeal that you read about in your book, how are you currently doing now?

Well I’m currently developing my next book and trying to deal with my current situation as best I can and struggling to keep my utilities on and the city has recently placed a lien on my home for back taxes,  so I’m doing my best to hang on to my home at present time receiving and receiving of help from no one, except my first sister from out of town is helping me keep my utilities on but it’s an everyday struggle.

You mentioned having a neurological disorder several times would you like to explain to your readers what you mean by that?

When I was very young I suffered a severe episode of scarlet fever immediately followed by several severe episodes of rheumatic fever and then Lyme disease. This was in the late 70s early 80s when there wasn’t very much information about the conditions of rheumatic fever and Lyme disease I was told by the doctors when I was in middle school that later on I would develop problems for many of the physical even though I did suffer physical problems from a very young age the neurological disorders didn’t show, I forgot about most of it till I was much older sometime in my mid-30s I started experiencing memory problems occasional problems with speech and problems with writing what I was thinking in my mind wasn’t necessarily the exact words I was putting down on paper and occasionally I would repeat words without realizing that I had done it,  is kind of a mixed bag but I’m trying to do with it as best I can.
 

Is there any advice you have for readers?
I would like to say that although I know it’s difficult in the pursuit of a normal everyday life that he can be very hectic, I also think that if possible you should try to pay a little more attention to your surroundings and the individuals that you interact with on a daily basis, if you feel something is suspicious or odd to you, follow up on it don’t ignore it. When I suspected there so that was something that might be wrong I kept telling myself that I was paranoid and I ignored all the very subtle warning signs.

Is there any aspect of writing you don't like (e.g. editing)?

Well obviously editing is not something that I look forward to. I do try my best, so I review my work several times I do catch the majority of my mistakes but I know that there still will be mistakes that remain due to my neurological problems I know that some of the sentences something that I read will look okay to me and I won’t catch all of the errors.

Have you ever had writer's block? If yes, how'd you deal with it? If you have not had writer's block, why do you think you haven't?

I wouldn’t say necessarily that I would call it writer’s block I think it’s more the problem that I have with depression that even though I can lie down in the middle of the night and think my words carefully and they float beautifully in the silence, but for me to get up and put them down on the keyboard is somewhat difficult and I have to actually look at the words proving to myself that what I’m talking about actually happened personally to me and wasn’t just a nightmare, if that makes any sense to the reader.

Do you write with a computer, typewriter, or pen and paper? Why do you use this tool?

I use a computer, I just think it’s much easier for rearranging my thoughts and corrections.

What do you have in mind for your next project?

I’m hoping that my next project will either being the 10 to 13 year experience I had in an unusual ongoing relationship or my experience with sexual harassment in the workplace, my horrible and surprising ordeal with the EEOC and how it impacted my daily interaction with others.

Is there anything else you'd like potential readers to know about your book?

I would like the reader to know that my main purpose of this book was to get the word out that no matter how impossible you think something is to happen to you there’s always that tiny possibility that it can happen to you,  remember the old saying, when you least expect it.

Thank you so much for giving me an interview,  I appreciate it and I sincerely hope that my books help people out there.
 

More information 
Link to book on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Neighbor-Stalker-Billy-Joe-Davis-ebook/dp/B00E9N77RI/ref=pd_rhf_dp_p_d_2 
Link to answering machine recorder of stalker: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yERm1oIoQ9k
Amazon author page: http://www.amazon.com/Billy-Joe-Davis/e/B00AAP7T1S/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_pop_1
Direct email:  williamdecade1 at yahoo dot com.  Please put author Billy Joe Davis in subject line along with your name.